How to Help Someone with Addiction

On this episode of Recovery X...

Dan Sevigny interviews Cassidy Cousens, founder of 1 Method Center in Los Angeles.

They talk about...

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    How to help someone with addiction
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    An effective drug & alcohol intervention strategy
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    How to help your addicted loved one, without enabling them to get worse.

...and much more! Watch the full video to find out.

Episode Transcription

Speakers:

Dan Sevigny (DS)

Cassidy Cousens (CC)

Dan Sevigny (DS):

Hey, what’s going on?  My name is Dan Sevigny, and you are watching the Addiction Education show on the Recovery X channel.  The topic we’ll be discussing today is “How to Help Someone with an Addiction,” or “How to Help Someone with Addiction.”  To answer that question, I’ll be talking with sex addiction, porn addiction, alcohol, meth, heroin – it runs the gamut – and the list goes on and on and on.  So, how do you help and treat these different types of addiction?

Cassidy Cousens (CC):

Ultimately, there’s going to be different ways to treat different addictions.  And, that doesn’t change the way that you approach someone that has an addiction, in terms of getting them into treatment.  So, the treatment for sex addiction is, obviously, going to be different, in some senses, than the treatment for gambling addiction or substance related disorders.  That being said, the process of getting someone to treatment is pretty much the same for every situation.

DS:

How do you get someone…  How do you approach them, and how do you help them, whether they want the help and, sometimes, they don’t want help?  Isn’t that right?

CC:

Yeah.  I think that one of the things that’s important, because it gets pretty overwhelming, there’s so many different circumstances where someone needs help.  I was trained by a gentleman named Ed Storti. And, Ed Storti was an interventionist who identified a motivational model of intervention called the “Storti Model of Intervention.”  And, what I can tell you about that is that there is actually a lot of optimism and hope even in the worst of situations when it comes to intervention if the intervention is conducted correctly.

So, let me give you the numbers really fast.  Ed Storti did a study on his own intervention style of over 3,500 cases.  So, that’s an incredible amount of people that were evaluated. And, of the 3,500 cases in the Storti Model of Intervention, which I’ll explain in a second, 80% went to treatment immediately upon being intervened on.  Of the 20% that didn’t go immediately to treatment, which is all different types – people that wanted to go, people that didn’t want to go, people that were angry, people that were sad – 80% percent went immediately. Of the 20% that didn’t go immediately, 80% of those went within 90 days of their own accord.  So, after the intervention, of the 20% that didn’t go, another 80% went. So, that’s incredibly successful.

DS:

That’s amazing.

CC:

Yes.  And, the idea of the Storti Model was, essentially, before its time.  It was a motivational model of intervention. And, like I said, I’ll sort of explain that.  But, what it means is that, no matter what the circumstances, there is a strong likelihood that if a message of hope is delivered in a receivable way to the person that’s suffering, no matter what their state, you can get them motivated, self-motivated, to go to treatment.   So, the question is, “How do you deal with the different types of situations that you find yourself in?”

So, let me just tell you what’s happened for me in the last, I’d say, 10 years of my experience dealing with people that need help with any type of addiction.  I sort of break it into three different scenarios – someone is resistant, someone is neutral, or someone is optimistic about treatment. They’re either resistant in denial, minimizing their problem, emotionally volatile, angry, lying, all the different things, characteristics of a severe addiction that are, essentially, preventing them from being willing to go to treatment.  That’s the resistant category.

Then you have the neutral category which is like someone who doesn’t necessarily want to go or not want to go.  They don’t have a whole lot of feeling one way or the other. And, then, you have the optimistic category which is the person who genuinely wants help.  They’ve sort of gone through the pre-contemplation stage. They’ve gone through the contemplation stage in terms of the stages of change, which we’ll talk about, and they want help.  And, the goal, ultimately, for every situation, is to take a person who’s resistant and move them towards neutral. And, someone who’s neutral and move them towards optimistic.

So, rather than, as a family member or a loved one, or an employer, or a son, or a daughter, or someone who wants someone to go to treatment that needs help, rather than think about it like, “I’ve got to get them to treatment no matter what,” it’s more important to identify what stage they’re in, resistant, neutral, or optimistic, and try to move them along that spectrum to be willing to go.

So, for the resistant person, which is often what you and I kind of understand as the classic addict alcoholic, the key is to sort of identify the word in intervention of the Storti Model that makes the more sense.  And, that’s “motivation.” It’s not an attack, and it’s not a confrontation. Rather, we replace that idea with, we’re presenting information, that we care, and we want someone to get help. And, often, that’s a more receivable message than, “F.U. You got to go to treatment,” or, “I’m going to pull everything unless you do what I tell you to do.”  So, if people can identify the emotional state that they’re in, as a loved one, as a family member, and get some grasp on how to deliver the most receivable message possible to a loved one, that usually propagates into a seed that allows people to contemplate what’s being said to them and, then, ultimately take action and, hopefully, start to investigate what their treatment options are.

DS:

Nice.  That make a lot of sense.  How would one go about finding out what category their loved one or friend falls into?

CC:

We had talked about this in our last interview, and this is something I want to be sort of really clear about.  I think that this is an incredible amount to take on, just as a family member who’s sort of uneducated. You know what I mean?  

DS:

Absolutely.

CC:

It’s incredibly overwhelming and incredibly difficult.  So, I would say to anybody watching this, first of all, they could call you.  Right? Or, they could contact you through Recovery X and start to engage in dialogue to explain to you what’s going on.  You can, then, evaluate what you think they need in terms of who to talk to. People can also contact me, and we can start an evaluation process to sort of determine what’s going on.  Because, it’s very complicated. Like, ultimately, someone may just appear resistant, but it might be that they’re suffering from some sort of co-occurring disorder like depression or anxiety, and they’re just having a hard time communicating how hopeless they feel.  And, they’re actually a little more on the neutral side of things. And, so, if you can get in there and sort of say things in a proper way, they might actually be more willing than they appear.

So, in terms of answering that question specifically, I think family members still need to go to, essentially, an expert and tell them what’s going on and get an assessment of where that person is probably at and how to best reach them.

DS:

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense.  It’s a huge task for a family to take on, especially when your emotions are involved and you’re really in fear for this person’s life.  That can all get in the way of the communication, for sure.

CC:

You bring up and interesting point.  One of the things that… So, when doing this, obviously, as an interventionist, you’re objective, you care a great deal and you want people to be successful, but you’re not emotionally invested in the way that the family is.  Right? So, you’re not muddled in your message, so to speak. But, one of the things that I talk about when I’m sort of coaching… So, you don’t have to have a professional interventionist in order to do a successful intervention.  You really don’t. Now, it’s often advisable, and it’s often necessary, but it’s not always required. And, there’s costs associated with an intervention. So, I like to be able to help as many people as possible, and sometimes that means kind of guiding them through a more family-oriented intervention.  But, one of the first things you say to them is, or that I say, ultimately, is, I ask the question, “What is your emotional state in relationship to this person?” And, you’d be surprised how often it’s actually “anger.” They’re incredibly upset and activated and angry, and one of the things I like to explain to people is that anger is ultimately a secondary emotion.  And, you’ve heard this before. This is a big one from Dr. Fisher. It’s like, “It’s fear, or pain, or a combination of the two.” And, so, they’re in a lot of fear, like you said, that this person’s going to die or cause some harm to somebody else, or continue to deteriorate and suffer, or they’re in pain that they’ve been sort of watching this unfold for months, years, decades, whatever the case may be, and they don’t feel like there’s any hope.  And, one of the important things to sort of look at in that scenario is that, if you sort of look at anger as a secondary emotion and identify what’s actually going on for you, if you can access the care that you have out of the fear or pain, or the vulnerable state that those provoke and communicate with the person that’s suffering from that state versus over-the-top anger, then, often it’s much more receivable because the addict is feeling incredibly ashamed and embarrassed, and they’re in a great deal of fear and insecurity.  So, fear, meeting fear, tends to reach conflict, pretty fast.

DS:

High levels of conflict at that.

CC:

High levels of conflict.  And, so, you really want to try to come in and be able to defuse that situation by knowing sort of what you’re truly experiencing emotionally.

DS:

That makes a lot of sense.  I would also add that another thing that families face is that, in the process of addiction, sometimes the closest ones to the addiction sufferer are those that are hurt the most.  We see people stealing from their family. We see people lying and going behind their family’s backs, taking time and energy and money, and there’s just so much harm done in the process that the addict is responsible for, but it’s also out of their control, in a sense.

CC:

Yeah.  It’s not a moral condition.  It appears to be, on some level, an immoral condition, because people are often lying and stealing, and they sort of have a blatant disregard for the emotional well being of others.  And, these are all pieces of what resistance looks like, ultimately. And, so, if we can sort of step back from that, which is very difficult. I want to acknowledge that. Like, as a family member, when you’ve been harmed repeatedly, the flame is often stoked, and you’re incredibly aggravated with the situation.  And, then, couple that with the concern that you’re experiencing for your loved one, and it can be pretty overwhelming. That all being said, one of the things that’s incredibly important when attempting to help someone is to know how to communicate effectively with them but, then, also to understand what the boundaries are that you can set up that aren’t essentially black and white and going to create a scenario where there’s an unhealthy crisis, but rather to funnel them towards a more healthy crisis.  And, I’ll give you an example of that.

One of the things that I initially learned before I worked with Ed Storti was something called the “Johnson Model of Intervention.”  And, this is kind of the classic one that you’ve seen on the television show “Intervention.” It’s kind of where people read letters, and it’s sort of sterile, in a way, not to be disrespectful to that style.  

DS:

Impacts letters, and then they set boundaries of what’s going to happen if they don’t take the treatment option?

CC:

Correct.  And, often, you’ll even see that they’re pretty rigid boundaries.  Like, immediate boundaries, “We’re cutting you off from everything.”  And, I’m not here to say that that’s the wrong course of action. It’s just a very classic kind of sterile approach that is completely different than what I was taught in the motivational model.  And, when I first was exposed to the, like I said, the Storti Model of Intervention, which is ultimately a motivational model, which doesn’t have a lot of that rigidity, and we don’t read letters.  Ultimately, we’re sort of talking from our heart and communicating in real time from a place of emotional vulnerability and spirituality, and it’s much more receivable. But, one of the reasons that people…  What I was told why we did that was because, let’s say I go and intervene on you, let’s say, I’m your brother and you’re screwing everything up and I’m scared and you’re stealing from me and all this kind of stuff, and I go to you and I say, “If you don’t go to treatment right now, I’m not going to talk to you.  You can’t see my kids. I’ve been supporting yourself and giving you these other financial resources, paying for your rent. I’m not going to pay for anything for you anymore, and you can never come around me.” Then, what’s going to happen is, what if you, in a state of hopelessness, try to suicide in 48 hours? Or, what if you, in a state of hopelessness and embarrassment and shame and pain, take too much and you overdose in 72 hours?  Me, as a person who went to talk with you, my intention was to help, but what I did was, I created an unhealthy crisis where there was no outlet. It was completely black and white. “If you don’t do what I tell you to do, everything’s going to fall apart.” And, I don’t want to, as a family member, feel like I did something that worsened the situation. God forbid.

DS:

It kind of puts them on the edge of a cliff.  Either, “Go back and take our option or fall off.  And, if you don’t choose the right option, that could be disastrous.”

CC:

That can be disastrous.  And, so, as a professional, and I would say this to family members, as well, it’s just a fine line to walk.  So, what’s a different way that you could create fences and the motivational model of intervention but not create the cliff scenario where someone doesn’t have the skills or ability to not fall off the cliff?  And, it comes from… I’ll give you an example. In like late 2002 or something like that, I was doing an intervention with Ed. It was on a young gal in her early 20’s, who was abusing methamphetamine . And, so, you can imagine how chaotic and crazy she was.  She had been smoking meth for about a year, and she was living at home. Her parents were, quite frankly, wonderful people, sort of salt-of-the-earth kind of people. Dad was a rancher. Mother was a stay-at-home mom who had devoted her entire life to her children.  And, we get called in to do an intervention. And, Ed sort of prepares everyone in exactly what I was describing, and during the intervention, the identified patient, the young girl, was incredibly volatile. I mean, she was rude. She was mean. She was attacking everyone.  She was cursing. Keep in mind, this was a really blue-collar family, and they weren’t used to this kind of insanity. Obviously, they’d seen it for a while, but they hadn’t seen this kind of toxicity.

The father didn’t speak through the whole intervention.  And, about three quarters of the way through it, he looked at his daughter and he said, “You don’t have to go to treatment.  I want you to go to treatment. You don’t have to go to treatment, but I can tell you, if you don’t, things are going to change.”  Didn’t say specifically what was going to change, just said that things were going to change. And, so, all the threats that I was referring to if I intervened on you and said, “You can’t talk to my family.  I’m going to take all the money. All the things are going to be off the table.” All the threats of “Things are going to change” were in there. She knew what it meant, but it wasn’t in an aggressive, immediate fashion.

So, here’s what ended up happening.  She retreated from the intervention. We waited 24 hours.  She went to treatment. So, she went to treatment because there was a gentle boundary that was put in place that, essentially, said, “We can’t continue to do this.”  But, it wasn’t in an intolerant or aggressive fashion. So, it’s not that if someone’s resistant on that spectrum, resistant neutral, optimistic, it’s not that you’re not going to set boundaries with the resistant person, it’s that you’re going to be very deliberate and diligent about the boundaries that you set.  Because, ultimately, you want them to self-motivate, to recognize, “I need to go from not being willing to do this, to considering being willing to do this.” A more neutral state. And, then, all of a sudden, you have a pliable person that’s willing to get help.

DS:

If they refuse the treatment and the boundaries have to be enforced, are those the same boundaries that they would have had in the original model of the intervention, and they’re just communicated differently, and how are they actually enacted?  Because, at some point, you have to actually set up the specific boundary. How do you go about communicating that?

CC:

It does depend a little bit on circumstances.  So, you referenced like, if someone is stealing from you, in all honesty, you should set immediate boundaries.  So, they should not have access to anything in your home or anything financially related, immediately. Right? Because, that is a level of disease, so to speak, that is going to really create problems, not only in that person’s life that’s afflicted, but in your life.  So, if you’re getting stolen from, that’s a scenario where you’re going to set immediate boundaries and pull all financial support. As a matter of fact, one of the questions that comes up is, let’s say that someone is stealing checks and writing them for cash on their parents’ account, one of the things that happens is, parents ask themselves the question, “What should I do?” and to be candid, if you want to know what I recommend, I recommend actually reporting that to the police.  And, the reason is, is because it’s going to worsen, and there’s like kind of a singular opportunity in the beginning when addiction is starting to have legal consequence that creates a healthy crisis, because that’s a scenario. If I’m in legal trouble, and I’m motivated by that legal trouble through that court process, to say, “I don’t want to go to jail,” which you’re probably not on the first go-around. Right? They’re probably going to say, “I want you to go to treatment, or you’re going to be put on probation.”  But, it’s scary. I think parents often, and they say to themselves, “Well, I don’t want my child to have a felony or a misdemeanor charge,” or whatever the case may be. They’re going to get a felony, and they’re going to get a misdemeanor charge, and it’s not going to be on a family member. It’s going to be in someone in the community that has a completely different perspective on your son or daughter than you do. So, better to take that now when you have some control over it, and you can advocate on their behalf during that court proceeding, and say, “Listen, I want my son to go to treatment.”  “I love my daughter, and I want her to go to treatment. I had to press these charges and bring them forward because it’s the only thing I can see that’s going to stop them, but I want them to go to treatment.” And, the judge and, often, the D.A., is going to say, “Okay. We get that. Let’s do it.” So, that’s a positive crisis.

Now, in other scenarios, when it isn’t stealing, it’s just general misbehavior, denial, minimizing that there’s a problem, lying, those types of things, but not direct violations of your space, or not physically aggressive with you, they’re not stealing from you financially, what you typically do is, you roll out those boundaries appropriately.  And, what’s the last thing to go? The last thing to go is the ability to contact the afflicted. So, oftentimes, the parents or uncle or aunt or grandparents, are paying for a cell phone. Well, at the end of the day, obviously, the person suffering is using their cell phone to get drugs. We get it. Or, alcohol. Or, to watch porn. Or, any number of different things.  At the end of the day, you still want to be able to get into contact with them. And, so, that’s probably the last thing that I would recommend sort of pulling. But, sequentially, if you’re paying for their car insurance, and you’re paying for their rent, and you’re paying for their food, or even sometimes school. Someone’s in school, they’re failing out, but you’re still paying for their school, you sort of give timelines where, “I can’t continue to do this.  I’m now enabling you. I’m enabling your addiction by paying for your apartment. And, in the next 90 days, I’m going to stop doing that.” And, you sort of, like, set these timelines in place. It’s not immediate and sudden unless it has to be if you think that, intuitively, that as a parent that’s the right thing to do. But you’re sort of rolling out the seriousness of these boundaries over time.

DS:

As these boundaries are being rolled out, are you having that intervention discussion again?  How often does that occur?

CC:

Here’s where I really like to defer to mothers and fathers and family intuition, and sort of empower them in the process because, let me be candid, in a strange way, despite being probably the most ill equipped clinically, family members are the most equipped emotionally and spiritually.  They just may not be able to access the tools, yet. Right? But, one of the pieces that they’re really, really, profoundly good at is, intuitively knowing their loved one. And, so, some people, like me, who’s a bit of a knucklehead, require kind of a two by four up to the head. And, in a really serious scenario, boundary situation, I will respond.  If you give me leeway, if you say, “It’s okay, Sweetheart. I understand that you’re struggling. I want you to get help,” I will continue to delay getting help as long as you allow me to. Intuitively, my parents knew that, and they gave me a two by four upside the head. Other situations are such that, it’s more gentle. It’s a process of sort of talking with your loved one at the right time, in the right way, to the best of your ability, and using your intuition as a parent to deliver these messages.  What I can tell you is that, when things escalate, and it turns into an argument, it’s best to step back. Because, at that point, you’re going to say things, and things are going to be said that can’t be taken back. And, it almost kind of worsens the situation. When you feel it escalate, intuitively, it’s best to sort of step back, let everybody think about what’s been said, think about what you’re asking of them, revisit it in a day or two, or three, and see whether or not there’s been any changes in their resolve to, or not to, go to treatment.

DS:

That makes a lot of sense.  One thing that came up while you were saying that about the escalation is, a lot of times the person suffering feels like they’re being controlled by the family or being told what to do, and it sounds like, in this model that you’re describing, there’s more of a choice for them, and it sort of empowers them to make the decision rather than forcing them to do something.  Is that something that you experience with that? Would you say that’s accurate, and is that important in that process?

CC:

Yeah.  I mean, ultimately, one of the things I used to talk about with Ed is that, and again, this is not meant to criticize, but I want you to think about this for a second.  It’s not just about getting someone to go to treatment. It’s about how they’re going to embrace the process when they get there. They have to have some skin in the game, and if they’re not subtly, minutely, self-motivated, then, you’ll have a body in treatment, but the mind and the heart won’t be there.  There’ll be completely…

DS:

A waste of money at that point.

CC:

Honestly, it really is.  And, then, with insurers, the way insurers are these days, they’ll often pay for 30 days of treatment which, by the way, isn’t enough.  And, then, if someone “fails,” which obviously they would, if they didn’t want to be there, then, they’re a little more reluctant to pay for further care.  So, it’s kind of a balancing act. Like, if their life is in jeopardy as a result of the substances that they’re using, either singularly or in combination, yes, it’s important just to get them into a treatment setting, kind of, no matter how they’re mentally facing it.  Right? But, if you have any time at all, the risk is even slightly lower than fatal overdose, which is often the case, especially with some of the secondary addictions like you’re talking about, you would want them to be as self-motivated as possible in order to get the most out of the treatment, especially if you’re trying to use insurance or if your financial resources are limited.  

So, I think that it’s, as I said, Ed would often tell me, “I don’t just want to get someone to the treatment center.  I want to get them to the treatment center understanding even what the treatment is about.” So, like, someone going to One Method Center, obviously, often intervention, is going to have an extraordinary experience.  And, they’re going to have an extraordinary experience because the founder is trained in intervention. So, when they come into the program, I know exactly how to approach them, and my staff is educated about how to approach them.  And, we’re not going to come in with big heavy hammers and re-stimulate that resistance right off the bat.

But, that being said, let’s say, you’re not going to One Method Center.  And, let’s say, you’re going to a behavioral modification program. Well, the interventionist or the family, they kind of have to educate them.  If you’re going to a program in the mountains, you don’t want to tell the person going to treatment that they’re going to a program by the ocean.  Right? Because, then, they’re going to get there, and they’re going to be like, “What is this?” You know what I mean? So, you kind of have to explain to them what they’re going to see and what their expectations are, and that way, when they get there, they’re not going to immediately, those walls aren’t going to immediately go back up.  So, you can be a bit manipulative getting people to treatment. I don’t want to… Use every tactic that you can, but don’t lie. Right?

DS:

That could be a problem.

CC:

That could be a huge problem.  And, I see it all the time. Absolutely.  People will say, “Go to treatment. You can have your phone.  You can have your car. You can do whatever you want. You’re going to get massages every day.”  I swear to God, I’ve seen parents do this. And, then, the person comes to treatment. You can’t have your phone.  You can’t have your car. And, you get massages if you pay for them once a month. Right? They’re like, “Screw this.  You lied to me. I’m leaving.” Versus, when I say “manipulative,” I’m not saying, “Be a bad person.” I’m saying, you could say, “I understand there’s also a holistic aspect for the care.”  You’re not specifically saying you’re going to get massages every day, or whatever else it is. But, “I understand there’s a holistic aspect to the care.” You know that that triggers an interest.  The interest might result in them being willing to go to treatment.

DS:

Sounds like a good strategy that’s not going to trigger those natural defenses.  I had one more question. Going back to the method of intervention that you were talking about - how you go about moving someone from one stage to the next.  How does that process work?

CC:

Interestingly enough, I think it’s through honesty.  We’re talking about three personality types which is a gross overgeneralization, but I think it’s fair for family members.  Because, it can get too complicated. But, resistant, neutral, or optimistic. Within those three archetypes there’s, essentially, a stage to change, or the stages to change.  And, they’re the same in each archetype. So, resistant, neutral, and optimistic all have the same stages of change. One is precontemplation. You’ve heard about this. Then, contemplation.  Then, action. Then, maintenance. There’s all these pieces. So, what’s important is to recognize, what we’re really trying to do is, we’re trying to see where someone is at in terms of precontemplation and contemplation.  So, precontemplation is, they don’t think they have a problem. They’re not even interested in going to treatment.

DS:

Denial, at that point.

CC:

Complete denial.  And, you remember that from your own experience when you were like, there was no clue that you had a problem with drugs and alcohol?

DS:

For sure.  Yeah, definitely.

CC:

It’s sort of wild looking back at it now because you can so clearly see it through the lens of time.  But, there was a moment where you were in precontemplation. And, then, at some point, you and I both started to contemplate, “Maybe I have a problem.”  And, at some point, once we hit that phase, we start to prepare for, What are the things that we need to do?” And, then, after that, we’re going to take some sort of action.  So, what a family is trying to do is kind of evaluate, “Are they in precontemplation or contemplation?” And, the first little goal is just to get them into contemplation. And, the way to do that isn’t through some sophisticated, clinical know-how, but to actually start to say things, “rehab, treatment, addiction, substance abuse, alcoholism.”  Like, you’re just saying words that are now triggering some contemplation.

DS:

They’re like, “Oh, am I those things? Is that happening?”  Get that internal dialogue going.

CC:

Yeah. Going back to your question, like, in an intervention, imagine doing that very intensely in a compressed period of time, in the space of really six hours.  Well, families trying to help a loved one with an addiction, they often have weeks or months. Again, if you’re at risk of fatal overdose or you’re at risk of real legal consequence, you don’t have that amount of time.  But, you’d be surprised how often family members have the ability to start having these conversations in such a way that contemplation is created when the risk is still not so significant that you have to do it all right now.

DS:

Well, I think that about answers the question, “How to help someone with addiction.”  Do you have anything else that you’d want to add to this, or anything you’d want to say to families that are looking for this help?

CC:

Again, I really think that it’s critical so people that are seeking help, it’s really important to get the help of a professional, especially because you kind of want to evaluate the level of risk that you’re in.  Imagine for a moment that, and I think you’ve heard this analogy, but like you go out to the beach and it’s a little foggy and you’re walking along and you don’t notice that it’s really wet and, then, after about an hour, you’re completely soaked.  Well, for family members, often the addiction has existed for so long that they become used to the dysfunction, and what is incredibly risky is normal for them. Or, what is incredibly dangerous, is normal for them. And, so, they can’t even see clearly that they’re in a point where they have to do something now, because it’s just normal.  All the dysfunction is completely normal. And, so, bringing in a professional oftentimes allows people to recognize, “Holy smokes, I got to do this right now. I don’t have the time.” Or, it allows you to approach it in a way that you do have the time.

So, I think, bringing in a professional is critical.  I highly recommend people contact you or me. And, there’s one thing I want to mention.  So, we’re talking about intervention and treatment. Both of these things cost money. And, so, there’s probably a bunch of people that are watching that are saying, “I don’t have insurance or money.”  Or, “I’ve got Medicare or Medicaid. I don’t have…” So, let me just bring this up. There is free treatment available in every state, all over the United States. I want to put on our Comments section a link to Samhsa’s Behavioral Health Treatment Locator.  There is absolutely no excuse, ever, for a family member to say, “We have no options available to us.” You can get into treatment in every state, all the time, every day, with no resources. So, don’t think about this as a monetarily, or health insurance motivated, problem.  The truth is, is that those things will be very valuable in the choices that you have, but there’s free treatment available for everyone.

DS:

Excellent.  Yeah. That’s a great resource.  I’ll definitely make sure to add that to the show notes.  Cassidy, thank you so much, Man. I really appreciate your time.

CC:

Absolutely.

DS:

So, for everybody watching, I hope you enjoyed that information.  That was Cassidy Cousens with One Method Center in Los Angeles. And, as always, please, please, please help us share this information around.  Remember to Like, Share, and Subscribe to Recovery X on Facebook, YouTube, and iTunes. And, as always, I want to leave you with one important message.  Cassidy touched on it already. If you, or someone that you love, needs help for addiction, you can contact us at Recovery X by visiting our website, RecoveryX.org, going to our Facebook page and sending us a message, or put up a smoke signal.  We’ll find a way to get in touch, and let us know that you need help. We will connect you with an expert like Cassidy or someone in your area who can help you for your specific needs. So, again, I’m Dan Sevigny. This is Recovery X. Thank you so much for watching.  We’ll see you next time. Thanks, Cassidy.

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