How to Find a Drug & Alcohol Rehab You Can Trust

On this episode of Recovery X...

Dan Sevigny interviews Cassidy Cousens, founder of 1 Method Center in Los Angeles.

They talk about...

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    How to spot an unethical or dangerous drug & alcohol rehab center.
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    How to find a quality drug & alcohol rehab center (at any price point).
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    Signs that your loved one is suffering from addiction--and what you can do right away to help.

...and much more! Watch the full video to find out.

Episode Transcription

Speakers:

Dan Sevigny (DS)

Cassidy Cousens (CC)

DS:

This is Dan Sevigny, and you are watching Recovery X, where experts, thought leaders, and people in recovery meet to exchange information, educate the public, and help solve the problem of addiction.  

Today, I’ll be speaking with Cassidy Cousens from One Method Center in Los Angeles where he is the founder, and we will be talking about the issue of how to find a drug and alcohol rehab and how to avoid bad actors and bad rehabs out there.  It’s a really big problem these days.

So, Cassidy, what’s going on, Man?

CC:

How are you?  Good to be here.

DS:

Doing great.  Thank you so much for joining me.  Let’s talk about how to find a rehab.  I guess, first of all, what do you think is the first place that a parent or somebody who’s trying to get their loved one into treatment would look for a rehab, and what are they likely to come across?

CC:

The data’s pretty straight forward.  Right now, about 70% of people that are enrolling in a treatment center are finding something online, which is actually sort of one of the problems that you and I have been talking about for a couple of weeks and how to approach this question, how to help someone choose a treatment center.  And, I’ve actually had a real ethical dilemma with this particular interview for the last couple of weeks because it’s such a complex issue, and I think that one of the things that’s come to light, obviously, this week with the John Oliver Show and just other things that have been going on with NBC and all this sort of opiate crisis information that’s sort of hitting the news cycles is that it’s pretty clear  that there’s rampant fraud, that there’s unscrupulous actors, that there’s, essentially, programs that are doing harm that are supposed to be doing good. And, that’s a problem.

So, it’s tough to talk about because as soon as you talk about it, you’re sort of in this circle where a lot of the people that represent themselves as extraordinary programs, and I don’t mean to speak negatively, but a lot of the folks that have accreditations and have the licenses and certifications in their respective states, are not doing things in a way that is legal, in the person’s best interests, and so it gets incredibly complex to try to navigate it.  So, I think I have a way to do this that’s pretty simple, and we can kind of walk through it and figure out how to help a family member essentially choose the right program, or a safe program.

DS:

Sure.  That sounds great.  I actually didn’t know that 70% of people turn online.  That’s a huge amount of people, especially given….

CC:

It’s under-reported.  They think it’s actually between 72% and 75%.

DS:

And like we saw, I don’t know if anyone watching actually saw that John Oliver, last week, Tonight episode.  If you didn’t, check it out on YouTube. It was really good. And, as he mentioned, once you go online to find a rehab, you’re likely to come across websites that are not necessarily clear and authentic about which rehabs they work with and might just be promoting one rehab in particular, stuff of that nature.  Do you have any other samples of that?

CC:

Sometimes when you’re calling one of those review sites, you’re going to be directed into a Call Center, and you’re not actually speaking with the specific program.  A lot of the actual commercials that you see on the television, those are, essentially, Call Centers that are spending millions of dollars a month to get someone to call in and then sending that to someone that pays them.  So, they’re not vetting the programs that they’re referring to. They’re, essentially, saying, “This person is paying more for this call, so we’re going to send them to them.”

So, what we did, obviously, let’s talk about what the solutions are.  In the show notes, you and I are going to place all the things to look out for.  We’re going to talk about 0:04:07.4 (??) fraud in the show notes. We’re going to talk about what’s happening in south Florida.  We’re going to talk about unscrupulous actors. We’re going to talk about all the dangers. And, you, as a family member or a loved one, or someone seeking treatment, your obligation is essentially to educate yourself to make sure that you understand what those pitfalls might be.

Now, the way that I sort of look at it is, the most important thing is to recognize that when we’re in crisis, like when we’re in crisis as human beings, our sort of executive functioning is intensely diminished.  And, so, when we’re in a stressful situation, what tends to happen is, we don’t make the best decisions. And, so, when you’re seeking a treatment center and your loved one is in a terrible position, one of the challenges that you’re faced with is how to make a proper assessment of the situation without getting overwhelmed and just sort of deferring to someone who may or may not be able to best understand your situation and support your son, daughter, father, cousin, friend, whomever it may be.  

The first thing is just to recognize that, in crisis, one of the important things to do is to really sort of slow down and take deep breaths and use your intuition.  I don’t care if you call a Call Center, and I don’t care if you call off a commercial online, and I don’t care whether you search online and find this video and make a few phone calls.  Like, that’s not the concern. The concern is when you pick up the phone and you make the call. Are you using your intuition? Are you feeling what’s happening on the other side in terms of, “Do you feel like they’re actually interested in helping your loved one, or is their first question ‘What’s your insurance?’”

DS:

Right.  And, then, the next question is, “Can we pay for your plane tickets to come down to treatment?”

CC:

Right.  And, we’ll talk about that.  I mean, the reality is that, if a program says that they’re going to pay for your plane ticket, they’re, at worst, committing an illegal act depending on the State that they’re in, and, at best, they’re committing insurance fraud.

DS:

What exactly is going on in that situation?  Why is that insurance fraud in some cases?

CC:

It’s an inducement.  You’re not paying for a person that doesn’t have an insurance benefit to fly to your program.  You’re paying for their insurance benefit. As a matter of fact, you can say whatever you want to say, at the end of the day, if they didn’t have insurance, more than likely, you wouldn’t do that.  So, the insurance company sees that as a form of fraud, and right now, about 20 plus states see that as an illegal act. We’re working on that in California right now, actually, legislatively.

But, recognize that you’re in crisis, and don’t lose touch with your intuition.  So, that’s what the first step is.

The second step is, in all honesty, you have to get an assessment.  You have to speak with an expert. And, I don’t know why more people don’t do this.  But, let’s just think about it for a second. Like, call someone that is in your family or a friend that’s a psychologist or a therapist or a drug and alcohol counselor, or works in the field, or is a doctor, that can at least start a process of educating you or doing a general assessment of the situation to figure out what your loved one needs.  Because, this is an interesting fact, but the reality is, you know a lot of the people that call me, they don’t need to go to Method. They’re in a complete crisis, and in having a conversation with them and sort of evaluating the situation, they may be more appropriate for individual therapy. They may be more appropriate for outpatient treatment.  They may be more appropriate for medication-assisted treatment. But, by no stretch of the imagination is that a common occurrence for people that are calling into a drug and alcohol treatment center. The reality is, is that most people that are calling a drug and alcohol treatment center, if you were to look at where that phone ended up, they would be in, essentially, a boiler room.  It would be people that were literally hitting a bell every time they got an intake because the call was a commodity and their only agenda was to convert them to a paying customer. Nothing to do with assessment, nothing to do with the person’s best interests, nothing to do with whether or not that’s the right modality.

We had talked about what John Oliver had brought up this weekend, three weeks ago, with the success rates and all the books, the misrepresentations, and all that kind of stuff.  So, if you’re in crisis, ask for help. Don’t necessarily make the call to a treatment center unless you’re confident that that treatment center has been referred to you by a health care professional who sort of knows what’s going on on the ground.

DS:

What sort of health care professionals should people be seeking out?  Who’s qualified to make that assessment or that referral to a good program?

CC:

It’s interesting.  You’d think you’d immediately say, “Well, doctors.”  Right? Doctors, in their entire schooling, only get an hour of addiction study.  Think about that. An hour of addiction study. So, “No.” If you’re an endocrinologist, you don’t necessarily have an area of expertise when it comes to behavioral health.  So, a lot of times, it’s going to be someone like a psychologist or a therapist, or an MSW, or a drug and alcohol counselor, even like the low end of the totem pole. It’s kind of like me.  It’s not someone who necessarily has all of the credentials and the Ph.D.’s and the Doctorates that’s going to be able to do this for you, so you don’t have to spend a lot of money. Obviously, if you call us, it’s going to be a free call.  If they talk with you, it’s going to be a free conversation.

Let’s say, worst case scenario, they spend $300 on an evaluation.  Well, $300 to get into the right program, I sort of think about this stuff, and there’s these abysmal success rates which we know, federally, are evaluated based on programs that are accepting federal funds.  So, this is what we know. We, basically, know that in federally funded programs, the success rates are about 20%, with a 4% variance. So, basically, 80% of the people are relapsing. We know that the success rates are abysmal, and we also know that there’s a very strong likelihood that it’s almost like people, the most important part of treatment isn’t treatment.  The most important part of treatment is pre-admission. So, during pre-admission, hopefully, you’re doing an assessment and researching to find the right program so that you don’t end up in a situation where I’m like, “I want to go to Brooklyn, and I end up in Texas.” People don’t even realize, they get on the treatment train, and they head in the exact opposite direction of where they need to go.  And, it’s because they didn’t get an assessment. They didn’t get an evaluation. Or, they entrusted themselves to someone who only sees them as a commodity, that they’re someone that’s going to pay them money, and that’s the most important thing to them.

So, an impartial evaluation is critical in order to head in the right direction when it comes to treatment.

DS:

In your experience doing these sort of evaluations, what criteria are you looking for to see if somebody is a good fit for rehab or even for One Method Center, or a different rehab?  What are you looking at exactly?

CC:

Let me give you a really common example.  I get a call from a family member, and they tell me everything that’s sort of going on with their son, or daughter, or uncle, or aunt.  And, maybe 20 minutes into the conversation, I’m sort of listening and getting a sense of what’s going on. I say, “Have you spoken to them?  Do they know that you’re calling?” And, they’re like, “No. I haven’t talked to them, and I don’t think I’m going to talk to them. I just wanted to figure out what sort of treatments were available.”  Well, that’s great, but the next question is going to be, “Do you think they would be willing to go to treatment?” And, 9 times out of 10, they’re not. And, what they actually need is an intervention, either a familial intervention or professional intervention.  They actually need to get motivated to go to treatment.

Another example would be, a lot of times, and it’s kind of interesting, there’s a big plug right now, there’s a prevalence of co-occurring disorders with those who suffer from addiction.  We know, again, these are 60% of the people that have an addiction are going to suffer from some sort of co-occurring disorder. And, that’s an under-reported problem. It’s probably much higher than that.

DS:

Co-occurring disorders being like, depression, anxiety, other things of that nature?

CC:

Sleep disturbances, bi-polar disorders, all these different things.  So, a lot of times, people actually look at it, and it’s easier to see depression and anxiety and bi-polar disorder than it is to see addiction.  And, so, they almost want to like go the opposite direction of what is probably most necessary right now. And, why do I say that? It’s not because the depression isn’t contributing to the addiction.  It’s because they’re using high grade Fentanyl , and if they continue to use that and mix it, they’re going to die. So, first priority is to get them physically sober, and once that’s done, properly assess and evaluate whether or not they need to be on medications or they need depression treatment that’s sort of a formal process that’s on-going.  So, a lot of times, family members, they just don’t know what they’re looking at. So, that’s one facet of it.

The other piece is like, we talked about this a few weeks ago and we said, sort of, “Everything looks the same.”  So, here’s a great question. I’m going to give some questions that people can ask facilities. Everybody says they do evidence-based treatment.  So, ask a program, “What is evidence-based treatment?” And, you want to know something? They don’t even know. This was kind of what John Oliver brought up.  Like, 10 years ago, all of a sudden, equestrian therapy became the go-to modality in high end settings, meaning, programs that cost over $60,000 a month, as the preeminent technique to treat addiction.  Now, I don’t mean to be disrespectful, but if fondling horses, which I happen to think is a neat thing, somehow cured addiction, don’t you think that there would be horses on every street corner that every addict could go up to and pet and suddenly be cured?  There was no evidence. There was zero evidence. But, people say it’s an evidence-based treatment. After it was horses, it was wolves. I swear to goodness. You started to pet wolves, and that was going to cure your addiction.

DS:

Why do you think these sorts of things are being presented rather than more evidence based, like, actually studied sort of methods?

CC:

Because the more you charge, the more hooks you have to have on the line.

DS:

I see.  So, it’s like a gimmick.

CC:

It’s a gimmick.  And, just so you know, I actually have an intense amount of respect for equestrian therapists.  I actually think that, as an experiential activity, it’s extraordinary. I don’t think that it’s worth an extra $30,000 in treatment.  For example, I take the client’s here on horseback rides. I think that it’s an extraordinary, super-ordinate activity. Well, what is a super-ordinate activity?  A super-ordinate activity is an evidence-based treatment. An evidence-based treatment is something that has been researched and proven to be efficacious in the treatment of something specifically.  So, what is the evidence behind going horseback riding with the group? Well, the evidence is that, as a community, people bond over this activity and feel a sense of belonging and purpose. And, that being entwined around the treatment process shows itself to be efficacious in supporting people being able to recover.  That’s evidence-based treatment. It has to be, essentially, research driven, shown to be effective. It has to be expertly diagnosed, meaning, someone’s got to actually evaluate it and say, “Dan has depression, and here’s the best treatment for it.”

And, then, the third pillar, it has to be preferential to the patient.  So, if I have an evidence-based box that’s “A,” and the patient has a need that’s “C,” my evidence base “A” won’t work for a patient that wants “C.”  It has to, not only meet their needs clinically, it has to meet their belief systems and their preferences.

So, the point of all of this, call up a program, one of these Call Centers that you find online or something, and they say, “We have evidence-based practices,” say, “What does that mean?”  They’ll get so tongue tied, they won’t even understand how to answer the question.

DS:

I think one of the other things I hear commonly along those same lines is that people think, and in some cases it’s true, you get a sense of rehab and they just give you AA big books and send you to some meetings and send you on your way, and don’t really add too much clinically on the other side.

CC:

Yeah.  So, here’s an interesting thing.  We call that the “Minnesota Model of Treatment.”  It’s introduction to the first three steps. I’m not here right now, this is why I was struggling so much because, obviously, you see I’m pretty passionate about it.  I take intake really, really seriously, both on a personal and professional level. And, it’s really challenging to see all the things that are going on. But, if you sort of step back and look at, for a second, there is evidence that tells us there are multiple modalities for someone to get sober through. The most effective of all of them is called an “Integrated Model of Care.”  The Integrated Model of Care is a bunch of different techniques in one treatment set. So, they don’t just do the Minnesota Model, they actually do a little bit of MAT. And, they don’t just do cognitive behavioral therapy. They actually do a little psychodynamic therapy, as well. There’s all these different things. And, then, as the client starts to respond to one or two or three forms of treatment, they increase the frequency of that treatment.  So, they identify what is working, and then they increase the frequency of that intervention. That’s the Integrated Model of Care.

Well, again, ask a program, “Do you offer an Integrated Model of Care?” and people will be like, “What’s an Integrated Model of Care?”

DS:

Even good programs, would they know what that is, for the most part, or would you say that’s sort of the standard of a quality program?

CC:

I do.  This is something that I wasn’t going to say.  Again, this was a real dilemma for me, this interview I’m telling you, because I’ve been doing intake for almost 20 years, and I’ve seen just craziness in the last, I’d say, five years.  It’s almost intolerable.

So, as a professional, as someone who’s intimately involved in mental and behavioral health, I would tell you that there’s probably about two dozen programs that I’ll refer to nationally.  And, there’s about 14,000 programs in the United States. Now, I don’t, obviously, know all those programs, but I know a lot, a real lot. And, even some of the most well known programs, internally, they don’t have anything like an Integrated Model of Care.  It’s really sort of turn and burn 0:21:15.6 bets(??). Like, bring them in, churn them out. Bring them in, churn them out. And, that’s exactly the opposite of what most people need.

DS:

Yeah.  Absolutely.  So, any other questions they should ask while they’re researching in this sort of research phase?

CC:

Yeah.  I think you need to go back to, you could watch the other videos that we did, but I think they need to ask what is their success rate.  Because, if they report a success rate, remember we told them, “You need to hang up the phone.” It’s an irrelevant statistic that’s designed to hook you in.  There’s no guarantee that a program’s going to be 60% successful or 80% successful. It’s just ridiculous.

DS:

And the success rates are going to vary, the measure for the success is going to vary from treatment center to treatment center.  And, sometimes, the only research they’re doing into that is just calling the former patient and saying, “Hey, are you still using or drinking?”  And, a lot of times, the patient will lie. Like you said, very meaningless numbers in many cases.

CC:

Yeah.  Completely.  And, it’s all telephonic follow up, because they’re not in the program anymore.  I do think that it’s important to ask what the financial policies are. So, “Do you have a refund policy?”  “Do you waive deductibles and copays and my responsibilities as a patient?” It’s important to know that stuff ahead of time.  And, if someone tells you, “We’re going to waive all your fees,” without asking for a tax return, just know that they’re probably functioning on fraud.  For example, I’m willing to treat just about anybody that meets criteria at Method, regardless of ability to pay. And, if someone tells me, “Well, I want a scholarship,” you know what my question is, “Can I see your last three years of tax returns.”  It’s not to be disrespectful, but it’s like, “If you’re telling me that you really can’t pay the $400, I need to see proof of that,” because the reality is that it’s fraudulent for me to bring you in without meeting your personal responsibilities. And, programs that are willing to waive those fees are often the same programs that are flying people out to treatment.  It’s illegal. And, so, if the program’s functioning illegally…

DS:

You can’t have much hope for the quality of care if their marketing practices and intake is illegal.

CC:

Correct.  So, I think, asking about the success rate, asking them what their financial policies are.  Another question is, and I encourage a lot of family members to do this, is to ask for an explanation of the program.  So, let’s say, they pass those litmus tests. “Well, talk to me about the programs. Tell me about the daily schedule and sort of what happens and how many sessions I do and who the sessions are with.”  And, the person on the other end of the phone is going to explain all this to the family member. Well, then, ask it to be put in writing. You know, “Two sessions per week,” or “We’re going to do five sessions per week.”  “Okay. Put it in writing.” Is that something that you’re willing to actually say ahead of time that we’re going to do? And, again, as soon as you ask these questions, a lot of these programs, it’s like, you’ve peeked behind the curtain, they know it, and if they don’t just immediately hang up the phone, they’re like, “We can’t put anything in writing.”

What thing costs $50,000 that you can’t have a pre-contract review with?  What place in the world are you expected to pay that kind of money sight unseen, based on a conversation?  It’s ridiculous. And the question we’re sort of asking is, “Well, why would people do that?” People do that because they’re vulnerable.  They’re in crisis. Their loved one is desperate. They’re desperate. They need help. They’re not thinking completely about all of these questions.  And, so, a lot of these unscrupulous operators, they take advantage of that. And, it’s really unfortunate. And, again, this is the dilemma, I don’t want to be a “Negative Nancy.”  I don’t want to demean an entire field. But, I’ve worked in this field for so long. You know, you’re the first person I’ve done interviews with, that I’ve been asked by actual major networks, to work with them.  And, the reason was because you were doing it on a grass roots level. You were like, “Let’s educate people.” Not to out us both. But, we both appreciate our recovery processes, and we want to help as many people as possible.  This is completely different than what most people find out there. So, as a person researching the process, you got to use your intuition to sort of feel that out and then listen to your intuition and make decisions that are rational.

DS:

Yeah.  It’s hard, especially if you’re relying on intuition a lot of the time, and you have no prior frame of reference for this kind of thing, you don’t know what somebody on the other end of the phone is supposed to sound like.  So, these questions sound normal. If the first question is, “What’s your insurance?” and it’s the first phone call you’ve ever had, then, you might think that’s just totally legit.

CC:

Yeah.  I mean, you want to hear something interesting?  I get a lot of calls, and most programs have what they call like 0:26:51.7 a Lead Gen(??) system or some sort of way of managing their leads internally.  And, what they’ll do is, they’ll essentially, and I’ve worked in large institutions that did this. This is how I know this. What they’ll do is, they’ll sort of put these callers on rotation.  So, “Let’s call them back in 12 hours, 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks.” And, what they’re trying to do is just get those people into their program, essentially convert that call into an admission. Right?

DS:

Yeah.

CC:

And, so, these folks, I’ll get calls from people, and they’ll tell me, “I just want to ask questions.  I don’t want to give you my name. I don’t want to give you any information.” And, I’m like, “That’s fine.  You don’t have to tell me what your number is. You don’t have to tell me what your name is. You don’t have to tell me anything.  Ask me whatever you want. And, just know, I’m not going to call you back. If you’re interested, you’re going to have to call me back.”  You can literally hear them on the phone breathe a sigh of relief because they’ve made a couple calls, and they’ve been getting just blitzed.  And, Dan, people sell their numbers. They sell their numbers. And, so, then they sell their number to a bunch of other… So, if you’re getting calls from these people that have bought your number, just because of your insurance policy or your ability to pay, how possibly can that treatment be viable?

DS:

Yeah.  That’s really predatory.

CC:

Super predatory.  And, this is why… I mean, how the hell do you talk about this stuff without being kind of like, “Oh, my gosh, what’s going on?”  

DS:

Yeah.  It’s hard to discuss these issues without calling out, or making a lot of the industry field called out because, frankly, many of them are doing a lot of stuff wrong.  And, I think that’s why we’ve seen segments like John Oliver’s come out. That’s why we’ve seen legal action in some states. Florida has been a hot spot for that lately with the Sober Homes Task Force.  It’s gotten so out of hand that it needs to stop. It needs to change. And, the state and federal government are starting to crack down and stuff. So, that’s good.

CC:

It is good.  And, there’s 17 bills right now facing the legislature in California.  So, there’s some good things on the horizon, and it really comes down to protecting consumers.  If you really were to sort of look at this, do you remember when there was all the nursing care fraud and there was all the Medicare fraud and, basically, there were people getting abused in the late stages of their life when they were in a vulnerable, essentially, disabled position, just elderly?  And, the Feds had to come in and say, “No, no, no, no, no. We’re going to protect these people. We’re going to protect this class. We’re going to protect our citizens. Here’s the rules that we’re going to put in place.” Because, those consumers didn’t have advocacy and they didn’t have a voice.  Well, we’re in that right now.

This sounds crazy, but addicts are being preyed upon, not just by drug dealers.  At this stage, they’re essentially being preyed upon by providers. It is mind boggling and intensely 0:30:12.6 (??), and that all being said, I really think, and this is something that is absolutely true in my experience, when a family member calls One Method Center, they speak to me or another executive.  They don’t talk to a Call Center. They don’t talk to somebody in a boiler room offsite who’s answering phone calls to try to get them to us. They talk to the founder, a clinician, a program director, an executive that’s actually going to be involved in the care. That is 100% the antithesis of what takes place in this field.  Does that make everybody bad? No. It just says that there’s different ways of doing things. And, so, when people call us, they feel that, and it helps them to trust the process.

And, then, again, remember we talked about, “What’s the most important part of intake?”  The most important part is pre-admission. So, if your mom sends you to me for treatment, how important it is that she trust the treatment when you get to the treatment center and you say, “I freakin’ hate this place.  Let me go home.” Those boundaries got to be in place, and she’s like, “Sweetheart, I’m willing to pay for this treatment. You got to stick it out. Stick and stay. You can’t manipulate and triangulate and get out of there.  And, the end result is that you get the help that you need.”

DS:

Yeah.  That’s a lot of…

CC:

0:31:37.4 (??)

DS:

Thanks.  Yeah. So, I think that covers just about everything, the things to look out for, questions to ask.  What else do you think parents or loved ones, or even people that are suffering, need to know about how to find a rehab and how to find someone that will actually help them?  I guess we haven’t talked about one thing which is how to find the right place. So, you’re kind of stuck with two tasks. One, making sure that the place you’re talking to isn’t a complete scam, but after that, out of all the places that are good, how do you find the right fit for you and your specific needs?  I imagine that’s different for each person. Right?

CC:

Yeah.   If you can do an assessment…

DS:

The assessment.

CC:

Yeah.  If you can talk with someone prior to going to treatment, then, what you’re going to get is one of the pillars of an evidence-based practice.  Because, you got to assess the situation. If you don’t have the assessment, which is, again, that’s what intake is supposed to be. When someone calls One Method, they’re supposed to get a comprehensive evaluation where we assess whether or not they’re appropriate for care with us.  You can do that on your own without calling us. They could call you, and you could assess and evaluate the situation based on your knowledge of the field. So, that assessment is critical.

And, then, the other part is, just because the website says it, and just because the person on the phone says it, ask them to put it in writing.  If you know what you need, and you need individual sessions, and they say that they’re going to provide four a week, just have them email that to you.  It doesn’t even have to be like something formal, a document that’s signed by attorneys and all that. Just have them email that to you because then you can bring that up when they don’t provide it and say, “This is what you said.  If you don’t provide me with what you said, I’m going to have to find another program.” And, so, protect yourself as a consumer until we can protect you as a government, essentially.

DS:

That’s all great information.  We should also cover, if they want to talk to you, we’ll leave your contact information in the show notes.  As you mentioned, you guys do free treatment assessments to help people figure out the right option for them.  Is that right?

CC:

Yeah.  Absolutely.

DS:

And, also, I’m always available, and the team at Recovery X is always available.  We’ll hook you up with somebody who’s the right match for your specific case, whether that’s Cassidy and One Method Center or somebody else that we’ve talked to.  We’ve got a very wide network and can send you in the right direction. We also should mention the free options. I know there’s a lot of free state and federal options.  Do you want to talk about that a little bit?

CC:

Yeah.  I’ll help you, if you don’t mind, I’ll send you an email and I’ll put some stuff in the show notes.  But, essentially, SAMSA, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration is a government entity that sort of has access. by very simple online searches. to all the free programs all across the United States.  And, so, in a crisis, you can go to this website. I’ll give you the link. They can put in their zip code, and it will bring up a list of all the free state and federally funded programs in their area. So, that’s a resource.

Obviously, if you don’t have any resources, you don’t have any insurance, you don’t have any money, pretty much, you should call and whomever says you can go, “You can come here,” I would go there.  Like, it’s going to be a little bit of different situation, but if you have any financial resources or an insurance benefit that covers in network or out of network, or both types of care, it’s important to know that you can probably get the best treatment for you available.  And, knowing how to figure out what is the best includes kind of asking some of the questions that we’ve talked about here.

DS:

That’s a lot of great information.  I really hope this helps some parents and some loved ones and some people suffering from addiction out there.  I just want to let everyone that’s watching know that if you have any questions, you can just comment on wherever you’re watching this video or hit us up on Facebook, and we’ll get them answered by Cassidy or myself.

Cassidy, anything else you think we should cover before we sign off?

CC:

No.  I just want to say “Thank you.”  I really think that, again, I know it’s kind of singing your praises, but, Dan, what you’re doing is extraordinary.  I’m just saying. It’s extraordinary, and I appreciate it.

DS:

Thank you very much.  Yeah. At Recovery X, we saw the lack of information that was out there and having tried to put some of my own friends and loved ones into treatment and running up against these same issues, that was what really kicked this off and inspired it.  So, I’m just happy to be able to give back to people that are still going through it.

CC:

Yeah.  Absolutely.

DS:

Thank you very much for helping out with that.  Goes one way, Brother. So, for everyone watching, thank you so much for watching.  Please feel free to drop us a comment or a message, like I said. And, we’ll see you next time.  If you have any questions, reach out and we’ll leave everything in the show notes so you can contact Cassidy at One Method Center or myself and the Recovery X team.

Thank you so much.  Cassidy, see you later.

CC:

Bye for now.

DS:

Right.

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